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sociologist at the oddness of moments

auto ethnography of a trans old advocate

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Created on 2017-04-10 04:48:09 (#3011362), last updated 2017-04-11 (15 weeks ago)

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Name:tyresias
Birthdate:Jan 12
please note: I find it rude to add me as a friend without asking first.
I have yet to visit Greece; I list it as a my location because of my username.
Veuillez noter: je trouve ça impoli de m'ajouter en tant qu'ami sans demander ma permission.
Je n'ai pas encore eu la chance d'aller en Grêce; mon choix d'endroit est du à mon nom d'utilisateur.

Do not contact me here about communities I co-mod. Use the e-mail address listed on their respective userinfo page.
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The knots and bolts go something like this:

I have a transient family scattered across the globe. I work in the public sector and most of the time I can't discuss large portions of what I do.

I'm happy to attend/observe a religion service/event (in whatever fashion is appropriate for an atheist to do so) but please remember my blog is a secular environment.

I mostly blog in English because most people on my flist are unilingual anglophones. Don't ask me to translate what isn't in English.

Music is essential to my life.

made in china

If you've recently joined my flist or could use a refresher on the backdrop to my life, go to these entries .
For a summary of the women who played a parental role in my life see this entry.
For the short version of what my birthdad does / how he lives his life see this entry.
For the background on the languages I know see this entry.
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-Yves Duteil, translation by me.

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Selon la mythologie Grecque Tyrésias (ou Tirésias) était un prêtre. Un jour, lors d’une marche sur une montagne, il vit 2 serpents qui copulait. Il pris sont bâton de marche et assomma la femelle, la tuant sur le champ. Pour le punir, les dieux le transformèrent en femme et elle vivat ainsi pour 7 ans. Lors d’une autre marche il vit 2 autres serpents qui copulait. Il fit attention ce coup-ci il tua le serpent male et se retrouva dans son corps d’origine.
Quelques années plus tard, Zeus et Héra avait un désaccord ; Zeus insistait que c’était les femmes qui jouissaient le plus en baissant et Héra rétorquait que c’était les hommes. Tyrésias fut appelé à résoudre la dispute, puisse qu’il avait eu la chance d’avoir fait l’acte aussi bien en temps qu’homme qu’en temps que femme. Il était d’accord avec Zeus. Héra furieuse pris un verre de lait et l’envoya en l’air, d'où on en tire le nom pour la voie lactée.

Tyresias was a priest in Ancient Greece. While venturing up a mountain one afternoon he caught sight of two serpents copulating. Without a moment's thought he killed one of the two reptiles. One of the Goddesses was so enraged from the death of the female snake that she turned the priest into a woman for his punishment. Seven years later whilst venturing up another mountain the priest saw two more serpents copulating. Thinking strategically, she killed the male reptile. She was thus changed back into a man and remain as such for the rest of his life.
A few years later Zeus and Hera were having an argument. Zeus contended women enjoyed sex more than men and Hera claimed the opposite. Tyresias was called upon to resolve the debate as he was the sole person they knew who had physically experienced sexual acts from both perspectives. Tyresias sided with Zeus. The goddess became furious and spilt a glass of breast milk across the sky (hence the Milky way) and cursed the priest for life.
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As a seer, Tiresias was regarded as inerrant. In Greek literature, Tiresias's pronouncements are always gnomic but never wrong. He is generally extremely reluctant to offer his visions like most Oracles.
During the Seven Against Thebes, Megareus killed himself because Tiresias prophesied that a voluntary death from a Theban would save Thebes. After the Seven Against Thebes battle, Tiresias appears in the tales associated with Oedipus. In Oedipus Rex, by Sophocles, Oedipus calls upon Tiresias to aid in the investigation of the killing of Laius. Tiresias refuses to give a direct answer and instead hints that the killer is someone Oedipus really does not wish to find. After Oedipus blinds himself and wanders, Tiresias appears in Antigone, also by Sophocles. King Creon of Thebes refuses to allow Polynices to be buried. His sister, Antigone, defies the order and is caught; Creon decrees that she is to be buried alive. The gods express their disapproval of Creon's decision through Tiresias. However, Antigone has already hanged herself rather than be buried alive. When Creon arrives at the tomb where she is to be interred, his son, Haemon, attacks him and then kills himself. When Creon's wife, Eurydice, is informed of their death she, too, takes her own life.

Tiresias died after drinking the water from the spring Tilphussa.

http://www.mlahanas.de/Greeks/LX/SevenAgainstThebes.html
http://www.mlahanas.de/Greeks/Mythology/Oedipus.html
http://www.mlahanas.de/Greeks/Live/Writer/Sophocles.htm
http://www.mlahanas.de/Greeks/Mythology/Antigone.html
http://www.mlahanas.de/Greeks/Mythology/Creon.html
http://www.mlahanas.de/Greeks/Mythology/Polynices.html

In The Divine Comedy (Inferno, Canto XX), Dante sees Tiresias in the fourth pit of the eighth circle of Hell (the circle is for perpetrators of fraud and the fourth pit being the location for soothsayers or diviners.) He was condemned to walk for eternity with his head twisted toward his back for in life, while he strove to look forward to the future, in Hell he must only look backward.

I have found both freedom and safety in my madness; the freedom of loneliness and safety from being understood, for those who understand us enslave something in us.
- Kahlil Gibran
Il est difficile de vaincre ses passions, et impossible de les satisfaire.
- Mme de la Sablière
Puissiez-vous vivre aussi longtemps que vous le désirez. Puissiez-vous le désirer aussi longtemps que vous vivrez.
- Toast Celtique
Vivir con miedo es vivir la vida a la mitad.
- Spanish Proverb
On reproche aux gens de parler d'eux-mêmes, c'est pourtant le sujet qu'ils traitent le mieux.
- Anatole France
Thinking is not the intellectual reproduction of what already exists.... As long as it doesn't break off, thinking has a secure hold on possibility. Its insatiable aspect, its aversion to being quickly and easily satisfied, refuses the foolish wisdom of resignation....Open thinking points beyond itself.
-Theodor Adorno
I remember the day I heard a trans man say about his former breasts: "It's such a paradox to have to cut some part of myself off in order to feel whole." Those words are inscribed painfully across my chest today more than ever, but make no mistake: this is the body not as foundation but as archive; this is the same chest, the same body, the same flesh I have always known, only now its text is totally different.
-Jean Bobby Noble
Men with a low opinion of humanity tend to have a high opinion of each other.
-anonymous
You need to spend less time reading research, and a bit more time thinking about what you are reading.
-anonymous
We must embrace the heresy of today, for it is the logic of tomorrow.
-George Bernard Shaw.
It must be exciting to think that way, but a drag to have to deal with the clinical diagnosis.
-anonymous
The truth is always a compound of two half- truths, and you never reach it, because there is always something more to say.
-Tom Stoppard
A language is a dialect with an army and navy.
-Joshua Fishman, Antoine Meillet or Louis-Hubert Lyautey

Cette carte n'inclus pas les pays ou je n'étais que de passage.
This map does not inclus countries where I merely commuted on my way to other places.

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visited 37 states (15%)


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accessability, activism, adoption, alternative parenting, anti-oppression, assurance santé, atheism, bears, beats, body building, canada, chirugies, cinema, civil servants, culture, dogs, droit de la personne, education, educazione, etymology, feminism, fonctionnaire publique, fourrure, francophonie, fur, greek mythology, harm reduction, human rights, loups, masculinity, masculinité, music, non-monogamy, ours, phalloplastie, phalloplasty, philosophie, philosophy, photography, poetry, policy making, politique, pro-choice, public health care, sea otters, slam, surgeries, traveling, wolves, éducation, étymologie
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